Sunday, 27 March 2016

Module 10: Co-Creation or Crowdsourcing



Module 10: Co-Creation or Crowdsourcing: Moving Beyond Multiple Choice
Monday, March 28, 2016 - Sunday, April 3, 2016

  • March 29: Find three kickstarter projects that are based in Alberta. Write a blog comment noting your critique of how the stories of the projects are written, whether the projects are (or seem to be) successful and what you would do to improve their success (in terms of the narrative and getting funders emotionally invested)
  • March 31: Having read Vladimir Zwass’s article: “Co-Creation: Toward a Taxonomy and an Integrated Research Perspective,” in a blog comment on my Module 10 post define:
    • co-creation
    • commons
    • collective intelligence
    • trust creation

6 comments:

  1. 1) Rage Yoga

    The "Rage Yoga" campaign is organized by Calgary yoga teacher Lindsay Istace. As of Tuesday, the campaign is funded at nearly 180 per cent.

    The campaign page on Kickstarter features an engaging video with a charming host. The name of the campaign, "Rage Yoga", is a great keyword. It's memorable and concise; making it ideal for search engine optimization.

    Also, Istace mentions that she's already held a series of "Rage Yoga" classes in Calgary. This built-in audience likely helped to grow the campaign online.

    This campaign also taps into trend started by Thug Kitchen; a vegan blog/lifestyle brand that employs healthy doses of expletives. "Rage Yoga" plays into the same narrative: taking a healthy lifestyle and making it edgy.

    Link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/725358217/rage-yoga/community

    2) Save the Bees

    The "save the bees. swarm catching and bee removals. protect them" is an example of less successful crowdfunding campaign. Though it was launched in late February 2016, it has yet to draw any backers on Kickstarter.

    The campaign lacks any multimedia element and the written description is simplistic. The campaign's creator, Rob Thomas, seems to have jumped the shark with his goal of $10,000. His biography states that he's a beginner apiarist; a fact that doesn't inspire much confidence from potential donors.

    Link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/offthefarmhoney/off-the-farm-honey?ref=city

    3) The French Square in Edmonton

    I find the "The French Square in the Canada Permanent Building Edmonton" campaign quite enticing. For starters, the Kickstarter page features a visually-appealing video showing food preparation ie. food porn. This presents the cornerstone of the campaign: creating "a temple of French gastronomy". However, campaign objectives seem muddled, as they state "our main goal is to preserve this patrimonial building".

    I suggest splitting the campaign into two stages: saving the historical building, and then developing it into a hub for French food.
    As it stands, the campaign does not seem to have a simple, achievable "ask" and raising $100,000 in one campaign does not seem realistic.

    The title of the campaign would be improved with an active verb and some articles ie. "Save the Canada Permanent Building" or "Create the French Square in Edmonton".

    Link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/thefrenchsquare/the-french-square-in-the-canada-permanent-building?ref=city








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  3. Vladimir Zwass (2010) defines co-creation "as the activities of individuals/consumers/users in the production domain, generated independently or at the behest of producer organizations." (p. 12)

    According to Zwass (2010), the commons is "where such co-created artifacts as [open source software] are freely revealed for open access," (p. 13) and "are universally shared resources, owned in common, as it were" (p. 18).

    Collective intelligence is "the emergence of intelligent behavior to surpass the intelligence of the individual members of certain collectives" (Zwass, 2010, p. 13).

    Zwass (2010) does not explicitly define "trust creation", yet equates trust creation to reputation systems (p. 23). E-commerce sites need to cultivate a positive online reputation in order to increase their business. By creating "reputation systems", sites like Amazon "collects, distributes, and aggregates feedback about participants’ past behavior" in order to improve perception of their brand (p. 24).

    References

    Zwass, V. (2010). Co-Creation: Toward a Taxonomy and an Integrated Research Perspective, International Journal Of Electronic Commerce, 15(1), 11-48, doi:10.2753/JEC1086-4415150101.

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  4. Co-creation: “the creation of value by consumers,” (p.11) which includes “sponsored co-creation” (p.11) which is directed by a community or individual, and “autonomous co-creation” (p.11) which is creation by individuals or communities which they conduct independently but may use tools that could benefit organizations economically. It is the creation of marketplace value by consumers.

    Commons: The commons is the a “virtual community" (p.16) space where most of the co-creation occurs. Most co-creation is available in the commons where is is accessible for all, it’s open source and open access.

    Collective Intelligence: Otherwise known as the “wisdom of the crowd” (p. 19) collective intelligence is either the contributions of a crowd together, or a crowd working individually whose work will be aggregated to define “prediction, preference or idea generation” (p. 20).

    Trust creation: Zwass writes about “trust creation” as a reputation system. Information about a “counterparties trustworthiness” (p. 23) can have a negative impact on a seller if the reviews by the crowd make them seem untrustworthy. He points to the example of eBay, where the reviews give a buyer a sense of the seller’s likelihood of coming through.

    References
    Zwass, V. (2010). Co-Creation: Toward a Taxonomy and an Integrated Research Perspective. International Journal Of Electronic Commerce, 15(1), 11-48. doi:10.2753/JEC1086-4415150101

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  5. Co-creation is "the participation of consumers along with producers in the creation of value in the marketplace" (Zwass, 2010, p 13). I would ditto Jennifer's distinction between "sponsored" (activity done "at behest of an organization" (p. 11) and "autonomous" co-creation ("voluntary activities…[independent] of any established organization" (p. 11).

    Raquel neatly sums up commons and Gwyneth wraps up collective intelligence, so I won't repeat.

    Trust creation, it should be noted, is specific to autonomous co-creation. Knowledge compendia (i.e. Wikipedia), consumer reviews, multimedia content, blogs, mash-ups, and virtual worlds are content that falls under the domain of autonomous co-creation (p 22-23). In absence of an organization that provides some evaluation mechanism (naturally embedded in sponsored co-creation), autonomous co-creation requires a reputation system to help participants evaluate reliability of contributions. Thus trust creation occurs through activity in reputation systems where trust is either built or diminished.

    References
    Zwass, V. (2010). Co-Creation: Toward a Taxonomy and an Integrated Research Perspective. International Journal Of Electronic Commerce, 15(1), 11-48. doi:10.2753/JEC1086-4415150101

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  6. Co-creation is defined "broadly as the creation of value by consumers." (pg. 11) Also to consider is the "Sponsored co-creation" which is done by a consumer by the order of an organization or producer, and "autonomous co-creation" which is when marketable value is produced voluntarily by consumers, independently from organizations or producers. Zwass also states "...treated broadly as the activities of individuals/consumers/users in the production domain, generated independently or at the behest of producer organizations." (pg. 12)

    Commons are resources that are shared universally. It is available to everyone, has open access and have enclosures for commons through property rights. Wikipedia and Creative Commons are listed as examples.

    Collective Intelligence is contributions and knowledge provided by the masses. People both work together and compete with each other, which generations more information, discoveries and advancements and collective behavior.

    Trust Creation. Trust can impact a companies reputation, which in turn will impact their success. Building trust is therefore a key factor and is very important in e-commerce. Consumers will interact with and purchase companies that they trust, and are capable of sharing their thoughts and opinions about how trustworthy a company is through the internet.

    Zwass, V. (2010). Co-Creation: Toward a Taxonomy and an Integrated Research Perspective. International Journal Of Electronic Commerce, 15(1), 11-48. doi:10.2753/JEC1086-4415150101

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